JaniceHeck

Finding hope in a chaotic world…

A to Z Challenge, 2014: Freshly Squeezed Adverbs

Oh Heck! Another Quirky Writing Error

I recently went to a street fair in Summerville, South Carolina, and amused myself by taking pictures of people and signs.

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I was a bit hungry and drooled over the deep-fried Oreos, the deep-fried mushrooms, and the hand-dipped corn dogs, but I resisted their high-calorie goodness. (Note the correct hyphen use on these popular street-fair snacks. I wrote about hyphens in “Deep-Fried Hyphens.”)

Street fair snacks: hand-dipped fried mushrooms, hand-dipped corn dogs, among other things.

Street-fair snacks: hand-dipped fried mushrooms and hand-dipped corn dogs, among other things.

I considered having a cool drink to quench my thirst.  I checked the signs and found that I could have

Fresh Squeezed Lemonade

Fresh Squeezed Lemonade

 

Freshly Squeezed Lemonade

Freshly Squeezed Lemonade

Fresh Brewed Iced Tea or Fresh Squeezed Lemonade

Fresh Brewed Iced Tea or Fresh Squeezed Lemonade

Hmmm. It got me wondering about hyphen use again. Which of these drinks is listed correctly? Should it be fresh squeezed lemonade or should it be freshly squeezed lemonade? And do either of these need a hyphen? The answers to these questions have to do with adjectives and adverbs.

Adjectives modify or describe nouns. Multiple-word descriptors before a noun require a hyphen to clarify meaning.

deep-fried Oreos
deep-fried mushrooms
deep-fried artichokes
hand-dipped corndogs

Adverbs with -ly endings modify verbs and do not get hyphens.

But now, here come the adverbs. Adverbs do not follow the same add-a-hyphen rule, primarily because the adverb makes the meaning of the phrase clear without any help from a hyphen, thank you very much.

  • Freshly squeezed orange juice.

The juice has recently been squeezed from the oranges. Freshly modifies squeezed (past participle), telling us when the juice was squeezed.

But wait, in this next example, fresh modifies orange juice, a noun, making its use okay as well.

  • Fresh, squeezed orange juice.

In this case, fresh modifies orange juice (fresh orange juice) making its use without a hyphen okay. It is fresh juice, and it is squeezed juice. A comma makes it clearer.

Here are examples of -ly adverbs correctly written without a hyphen.

**  recently discovered secret
**  freshly baked bread
**  freshly brewed tea
**  freshly pieced quilts
**  newly discovered ores
**  freshly picked veggies
**  brightly lit sign
**  highly paid officer

Now, just to confuse things, you use hyphens with some adverbs, (much-deserved vacation, well-known author), but I’ll write more about this in another post.

If you want to read more about orange juice, you can read this article: Freshly Squeezed: The Truth about Orange Juice in Boxes.

And you might want to try this recipe for Fresh Squeezed Lemonade.

Space invaders would probably get all of these hyphens mixed up, but wait, they can try the Alien Sippers: fresh lemonade that happens to be from squeezed lemons.

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But who worries about hyphens on a hot day at a street fair while drinking cool lemonade or orange juice. Well, me. Obviously.

Your turn: What quirky errors do you find in writing? Which ones annoy you the most?

**
Janice Hall Heck is a retired educator, blogger, wannabe photographer, and now nitpicky editor of On the Horizon, a bi-monthly community newsletter for Horizons at Woods Landing, Mays Landing, NJ.

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12 thoughts on “A to Z Challenge, 2014: Freshly Squeezed Adverbs

  1. I live in Greenville, SC😉

    • I love my visits to South Carolina. My brother lives there, so stop by several times a year. The temperatures are a bit milder than we have in South Jersey, and I definitely prefer that. Thanks for visiting my blog.

  2. Wonderful post! It made me grin and crave lemonade. Grammar is so dry, but you have proved that it does not need to be!🙂

  3. Great post once again.🙂

    I’d insert a comma between multiple adjectives that modify the same noun to make the intention clearer: “Fresh, squeezed lemon juice.” Now I have to go make myself a glass of fresh, delightfully refreshing, awesome orange juice.

  4. Stopping by from the A to Z Challenge. Going to bookmark your site as I can use all the grammar help I can get.

  5. Pingback: A to Z Challenge, 2014: G is for Gobs of Hyphens Used Correctly | JaniceHeck

  6. Pingback: A to Z Challenge, 2014: Hyperventilating on Hyphens | JaniceHeck

  7. I’m with Amos on the use of a comma, and as long as the writer doesn’t get carried away and go on a comma fest; it works well.
    Another good post, and I think I’ll be adding your A-Z to my list of places to visit frequently when the challenge is over.

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